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't know what would best fit jennifer. she has not only under mayor lee but also mayor gavin brown -- newsom. [laughter] now lieutenant governor under mayer brown bossed governor brown -- now the lieutenant governor under gov. brown. she is the director of the department of economic and workforce development. please welcome her. [applause] >> i don't know what the equivalent is but i think i am more the taskmaster, safe driver. still ginsberg, the director of the park, thank you. we would not be here today without leadership and guidance of the port commission represented by kimberly brandon. the director of the office and workforce development, my duties include the interest and development, business attraction and retention, small business development, international trade and commerce and workforce development. when you listen to the job description, you understand why this is so important. this is not only a breathtaking spectator event that will mark us internationally, this touches on nearly every aspect of what we do to improve the economic climate of san francisco. the ameri
>> and it is my honor to introduce governor jerry brown of california. i think. ok. in ibm research, one of the things we talk about is our laboratories. i have been all over the world, live in different countries. i am a relatively recent transplant to california. i would like to let the governor know that i am happy to be here. it is a good space. recently, governor brown has spent a lot of time, focus, and effort making california a better place. focus on eliminating waste, increasing efficiency, decreasing the budget deficit, and real focus that we appreciate in northern california on clean energy. for example, moving the state's goal to be 33% clean energy producing. it is my privilege to welcome governor brown to the panel. [applause] >> and to introduce our next panelist, i would like to welcome steve ballmer, senior bp -- vp. >> good morning and thank you. next up is governor hickel lipper -- hickenlooper. he is the serieaal a entreprener each of you have in your respective parts. he became very successful in the brew pub business. he never had a single election not even for stin
: thank you, and they are brown, and thank you, everybody, for coming. -- thank you, mayor brown, and thank you, everybody, for coming. the years that followed the san francisco earthquake were filled with grandiose plans to rebuild our city. perhaps the best realize is the san francisco memorial -- war memorial and performing arts center. the ground was broken to build the war memorial in honor of san franciscans who had served during world war i. in addition to honoring those veterans, the memorial gave a permanent residence to the opera, the symphony, and eventually, the ballet. the war memorial and performing arts center has great historic significance, including housing, the signing ceremony of our united nations charter in 1945. today, we are making history erosity and support of mr. and mrs. stephen bechtel. with a grant of $1.5 million -- [applause] from there foundation and in honoring charlotte and george shultz, we are that much closer to fulfilling the original vision of the war memorial complex, which was to include a moral right in his courtyard. as a small token of
for california. -- loomost of us still look to california. what governor brown said about the traditional politics is all about taking the thing in making it fresh. to a certain extent, i tried to be a writer in college. i failed miserably. a professor said everything has been set but not everything has been said superbly. even if it had, everything must be said freshly again and again. you have to see a fresh lead to a certain extent. the real issue with -- in terms of asking the president, what are the things that matter most, a bass part of those profits would be invested in california. colorado would have a significant -- pretty much every state in the country would benefit. you look at the companies based in silicon valley. they have offices, you want to expand your business, think about those young people in colorado. everything -- stated say the same thing. that money would get spent over the country very rapidly. >> thank you. governor brown. >> it is a good idea to bring back that $1 trillion sitting out there. how to do that, it remains to be seen. but then that will require som
. speaker brown and mr. speaker scott. >> good morning. my name is sharon and i'm vice chair of the district 11 council and a 4 year resident which is located in the heart of district 11. i do not come forward to test by earlier because my neighborhood has never seriously been in danger of being split into another district. but i wanted to take this last opportunity to speak, to publicly thank the task force for not just listening to the public, but to actually hearing all the folks who came to testify. and for your commitment to keeping neighborhoods whole. for you reuniting the other neighborhoods that were split 10 years ago. i also wanted to thank the consultants and kay for all their work in getting the draft maps and the boundaries up on the website so quickly. and lastly i would like to thank any fellow council members who came to testify so passionately but respectfully for their neighborhoods in district 11. so far we have only lost population in those areas we all agreed to sacrifice to keep district 11 whole. it is an honor to serve with them on the council and to have them as fr
>> thank you. governor brown. >> it is a good idea to bring back that $1 trillion sitting out there. how to do that, it remains to be seen. but then that will require some other tax. that would be my big request like everybody else. get america's finances under control and that will take both parties. it will take taxes and it will take reduction in commitments that have been made. it now can be validated. let's get this but do it in a way that exacerbates the uncertain economy. the second -- we have to happen through innovation. whether it is the space program or tax credits for renewable energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends
is mar zel brown and i work with central center -- >> i'm sorry, hold on one second. only because it's not your turn just yet. it's bruno. >> good morning, a pleasure to be here this morning. this is on such a sort an important issue. i personally want to commend you all in your work. i think perhaps the most important is the fact that you listen, you're listening to a lot of these comments and you've been making decisions accordingly. i just learned or i hope that it is the case i've heard a group, who was very important, very critical to the organization to who we are have been made whole. i'm here to speak for an institution that is part of, it's partner of the organization. we are the -- i am the senior warden of that church. that church has been in district five for at least 89 years. and it's one of the largers in the area. it is prominently located. we feel for the last four to five years have established a relationship with an organization that is well known that are very, should we say pervasive in the whole area. to established this relationship, now they have four walls. t
of people that we did like you to know who they are. for one thing, reverend brown in the front. can we get a round of applause for the president of the commission? we have thjoyce armstrong. right now, i will ask for a round of applause for the housing authorities executive director. >> good morning, everyone. for those of you who do not know me, and henry. when i am running around in our communities, most folks -- i am so excited that you are here today. we have been working on this center for some time. today, we get to give it back to the residents in this community. thank you. absolutely. i think it is stellar. it is awfully exciting. we have a lot of dignitaries here this morning. i am going to get at of the way so we can get the program moving along. i want to introduce the best mayor i have ever worked for. >> good afternoon, everyone. welcome to rosa parks community center. it is my pleasure to join it with our police chief, housing authority commissioners, the great work they are doing with our director to help open up this revitalized community center. this center serves almost 3
you want to fried chicken bites so golden brown. pity another poor mother her catfish, mango shake shook every wrchlt the little girl on the straw never blinked channelling opiuman cesters through the ecstasy of fruit sures. this is us at farmer's market. brother too complicate who had offers an arm for her and me. a chain of chins along his shoulders. where have you been and why has it taken you so long to come back? >> the piece dedicated to my foster father and cousin on my adopted side. 1, daddy. old crow, jack dan jells understood my father mouthfuls at a time. jim beam and old forester where uncles rolled up in the sufficiented hennesy take it's first breath and hound dog laughter and dominos falling like hail on the dining table. relatives existed through stories and memory ease in like zombies on ropes of camel smoke and demand a texas holdum. no wonder they call it spirits. spirits vad my father with cower vas yea. spirits made him burn rubber screaming in the driveway. the marianet and tongue were skillets at mid night. i wouldn't see his ass again until the next afterno
flower and plants that remain as brown stubbel on the chins of my train. take care of dry foilage. i let the japanese maybel swat the afi ds on it's own. purple spotted brush. 2 calla lillies take root. birds return listening to lost meats all day until dusk beckons them to come to the nest and try again in the morning. this next poem is indian an ina ontholingly. on telegraph avenue it's no longer in existence, the sadness of this. berkeley, late fall. um -- this is from forest hamer who is a bay area poet who wrote berkeley late spring. this is berkeley late fall. i have been browsing the peet ree section had come to lose the unconcern but persistant rain that followed me in as a trail of damp shoe prints and dripping conscientious hacompanied to a solitude. i ran my right index if anything are across each spine flesh going along volume and groove. imagine the book seller anding by to fold and flatten we down to on an oblong shape and reshelf me into an americay sandwich between the t's and v's stacked up along the unexpected and unknown. i notice that the pe ems i imagine crowding aro
state. we're missing a tremendous opportunity. >> thank you. governor brown, i'm sure you know that on any given day, people from other states are knocking on doors of co's in the valley and trying to get them to expand in other states or move to other states. someone in this room may have engaged in that. >> they cannot all expand in california. we are try to help california. quex their offering tax breaks. >> we are not offering a break. >> not only you. what do you say to the ceo's? what are you trying to do it? what are two or three things you are doing to keep companies here? >> we take specifics. i met yesterday with the representative of nissan and they're very interested and supportive of the installation of high-speed chargers throughout california. we have a plan, criticized by some but nevertheless, well funded by a legal settlement of $100 million. to get these charging stations in throughout the bay area and down the coast to los angeles. they sold 5000 electric cars and they want to keep expanding. problem, permits. some people are making it hard, some cds are mak
of these asian pacific heritage month associations, mayor willie brown. >> this evening, we are celebrating our communities from all over the world. i am so lucky to be the mayor of an international city. we talked a lot about diversity, but we also celebrates in so many ways. it is marvelous to hear the names of all these council generals from all around the world. we also have some invaluable participants that represent the city relations. from osaka, singapore, shanghai, taipei, and seoul, korea. they're working with our offices and communities to promote education, trade, allow ourselves to educate ourselves continuously about the need to have a more advanced, smarter immigration policy for our country. and also one that we enjoy celebrating because we get a lot of talent from the other countries, which is why we want to be a gateway to the world. that is why we enjoy the celebration so much. with that, i like to invite former mayor willie brown and also the supervisors, please join us on the stage and be part of the witness and of the signing of the proclamation for this year imposed a cel
have found my place here and i have mentioned, i began my career here in 1996 with mayer brown. i realized then in my 20's that i needed to pursue higher education. and it helped the mayor said he would never give me a raise or promotion on till i went back to school. i enrolled in the university of san francisco law school. i got my j.d. and pass the bar. -- passed the gar. -- bar. [applause] san francisco has been my home. six years ago i was married here on the steps almost six years ago to this month. [applause] some are clapping, some are not. [laughter] it has been a fundamental time for my family and i having been nominated. by mayor ed lee and i am grateful to that community and i am grateful to the mayor and the board of supervisors who are considering this nomination. i vow to do the best job i possibly can for the city and i have -- as i have done from the outset of my city career. i will continue to draw inspiration and guidance from the black woman in our history and culture who have paved the way for me and others with their relentless fight against prejudice and int
the supreme court decision on brown was right, they would drive you out of the state either by fear, by cutting you off from all your friends, by cutting your wife off. i mean, they just made-- in effect, they snuffed out freedom of speech. so freedom of speech was a very real issue in this thing-- whether an editor had the right, the willingness, the courage to say the things that in his heart-- and i should say "her," because hazel brannon smith in mississippi in holmes county was just so ferocious and so courageous. and so punished. punished. i mean, they just stripped her, and they set out to crush her economically, as they did so many other people. so these were very nice, genteel, soft police states. and, ken, i would just say that it was an accident, i think, that david halberstam came to work for the tennessean at the moment a very bright, a very-- a very courageous group of young african-american students had enrolled themselves in four local institutions of higher education: fisk, meharry, tennessee state, and american baptist college. and those young students really began
serving all of our citizens and visitors -- 5000 dedicated people. i want to thank former mayor brown for being here as well. [applause] archie protocol officer -- our chief protocol officer, thank you for being here as well. [applause] someone i learned a lot from being city administrator, our previous city administrator. thank you for being here. i am so thrilled to share the stage with so many of our elected officials, our mta board, our supervisors, but certainly, foremost in my mind has been our wonderful senator dianne feinstein, who really have the compassion for this system. before i introduce her, i just wanted to just let you know again how valuable this system is to us and what it means to us today, but in recognition of that, before we do that, it still is -- i mean, we've got 63 bus routes that are managed by our mta. seven light rail lines. the historic f line streetcars, of course. 700,000 daily borders of our mta -- daily boarders of our mta. of course, senator, as you so well articulated just moments ago, no mayor can ever escape a comment on a daily basis about someb
, and they are brown, supervisors, other officials and guests -- mayor brown, supervisors, other officials and guests, muni is today what it is because of people like mr. flynn devoted their lives to it. i am joined by several directors, including our vice president, who leads a lot of our efforts. doug is the man who, when he was deputy mayor and planning commissioner, had a lot to do with the embarcadero uc today. -- you see today. he has given so much of his time to san francisco to make it a better place. we joined today in celebrating america's first big city publicly owned transportation system owned by the people themselves. today, it is a landmark of the progressivism that has marked our city for a century. the historic streetcar we rededicate today, is a city symbol of the history. it carried generations of san franciscans around the city to shop, to work, to learn, to play. it almost certainly carried my grandparents when they lived on utah st. and is america's first publicly owned big city streetcar, it almost certainly qualifies to be sitting on display at the smithsonian, but we in san f
you, mayor willie brown. it is an honor to be with you on this occasion. it is very appropriate to name a facility after george and charlotte. san francisco is home for many important people, but none made as great a contribution to our country as george shultz. charlotte has given great service to our city and our state. i believe all year extend a great thanks to them for their great services to our country, to california, and to san francisco. i would like to complement our city for recognizing at them in this manner -- i would like to compliment our city for recognizing the - manner. thank you very much. [applause] that of mayor -- >> mayor lee, the time has come. join me and proceed to do the dedication of horseshoe drive, which has been dedicated by the opera house board in honor of george and charlotte schulz. mayor lee: it is my pleasure joining all of you to announce this dedication on behalf of our city, on behalf of the war memorial, dedicating this carriageway to be charlotte and george shultz way of san francisco. [applause] horseshoe drive. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> la
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 218 (some duplicates have been removed)